Washington and His Generals - Vol. 1

By Joel Tyler Headley | Go to book overview

the fever of the climate, dying while on his way to join the army under Washington.

The family of General Moore was of the highest respectability. His grandfather, who was the first of the name in North Carolina, was appointed governor of the colony in 1705, and claimed descent from the Marquis of Drogheda, of Ireland. A nephew of General Moore became distinguished as attorney-general and chief justice of North Carolina, and afterwards as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.


BRIGADIER-GENERAL JOHN PATTERSON.

BERKSHIRE county in Massachusetts is famous for the heroism displayed by her sons in the Revolution. On the morning of the battle of Bennington, it is said that one of her clergymen, who had led a portion of his flock to the field, remarked to General Stark, "We the people of Berkshire have been frequently called upon to fight, but have never been led against the enemy. We have now resolved, if you will not let us fight, never again to turn out." Stark asked him "if he wished to march then, when it was dark and rainy?" He answered, "No." "Then," continued Stark, "if the Lord once more gives us sunshine, and I don't give. you fighting enough, I will never ask you to come again." The weather cleared up in the course of the day, and the men of Berkshire followed their spiritual guide into action, where they doubtless did good service.

JOHN PATTERSON, of Lenox, in this county, was a member of the first Provincial Congress of Massachusetts, which assembled at Salem in October, 1774, and of the second Congress, which met at Cambridge in February, 1775. He had already organized a regiment of minute

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