The Complete Gentleman: The Truth of Our Times, and the Art of Living in London

By Henry Peacham; Virgil B. Heltzel | Go to book overview

which he, perceiving, in a rage struck me with the great end of the rod and rent my paper, swearing it was the only way to teach me to rob orchards; besides, that I was placed with him to be made a scholar of and not a painter, which I was very likely to do; when, I well remember, he construed unto me the beginning of the first ode in Horace, "Edite, set ye forth, Maecenas, the sports, atavis regibus, of our ancient kings." But leaving our ingenious master, to our purpose.6


CHAPTER XV
Of Armory, or Blazon of Arms, with the
Antiquity and Dignity of Heralds

IT IS meet that a noble or gentleman who beareth arms and is well descended be not only able to blazon his own proper coat, derive by pedigree the descent of his family from the original, know such matches and allies as are joined to him in blood, but also of his prince, the nobility, and gentry where he liveth; which is not of mere ornament, as the most suppose, but diversely necessary and of great consequence; as, had I fortuned to have lived in those times when that fatal difference of either ROSE was to be decided by the sword, with which party in equity and conscience could I have sided had I been ignorant

____________________
6
Those pages (127-154) of the 1634 edition which give specific information on how to draw and paint, and which set forth the sketchy notices of Italian painters, have been omitted. Also omitted is the chapter following, XIV, "Of Sundry Blazons, both Ancient and Modern" (pp. [154-160], no pagination 154-159, 160 mispaginated 154).

-130-

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