Notes

Chapter 1
1.
Levy, Gate of Horn, 62; she is called by James the "life-producing Mother as the personification of fecundity" behind whom lies "the mystery of birth and generation in the abstract, at first in the human and animal world with which Paleololithic Man was mainly concerned" ( Cult of the Mother Goddess, 228).
2.
Neumann, Great Mother, 96.
3.
Mallowan and Cruikshank, "Excavation,"87.
4.
James, Cult of the Mother Goddess, 41.
5.
Guthrie, Early Greek Religion, 39, quoted by Petterson, Mother Earth, 77.
6.
Eliade, History of Religious Ideas, vol. 1, 40.
7.
Pettazzoni, Allknowing God, 435; Eliade asserts "since women played a decisive part in the domestication of plants, they become the owners of cultivated fields, which raises their social position and creates characteristic institutions, such as, for example, matrilocation" ( History of Religious Ideas, vol. 1, 40).
8.
Gimbutas, Gods and Goddesses, 195-96.
9.
Piggott, Prehistoric India, 127.
10.
Campbell, Masks of God, vol. 3, 70-75, assumes that the best-known mythological expression of this happening is contained in the Babylonian creation myth where the female all-mother is destroyed by her descendant Marduk.
11.
Apuleius, Metamorphoses XI.
12.
James states that "the function of the male in the process of generation became more apparent . . . as the physiological facts concerning paternity were more clearly understood and recognized. Then the Mother-Goddess was assigned a male partner" ( Cult of the Mother Goddess, 228); ibid., 22.
13.
Hančar examined ninety-five hunting stations in Siberia, the place from which the figurines might have found their diffusion ("Problem der Venusstatuetten"). Alexander Marshack , Roots of Civilization, 281-340, describes not only the statuettes of

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The Faces of the Goddess
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 the Great Mother 5
  • Chapter 2 the Rise of a Goddess in Our Time 24
  • Chapter 3 Reverence of Nature: Northern Eurasia 39
  • Chapter 4 the Creativity of Suffering: the Eskimo 59
  • Chapter 5 the Lady of the Manor: Latvia 70
  • Chapter 6 the Human Condition: Mesopotamia 84
  • Chapter 7 the Mountain Mother: Anatolia 99
  • Chapter 8 Demeter, the Ravished Earth: Greece 121
  • Chapter 9 the Exaltation of Death: Mexico 148
  • Chapter 10 Amaterasu and Her Sacred Land: Japan 165
  • Conclusion 179
  • Abbreviations 187
  • Appendix a the Sedna Tales 189
  • Appendix B Derivation of the Goddesses 196
  • Appendix C Development and Growth of the Goddesses 197
  • Appendix D Classical Authors and Works 198
  • Appendix E Mexican Sources 200
  • Notes 202
  • Bibliography 256
  • Picture Credits 271
  • Index 272
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