Allied Intrigue in the Low Countries: Further Documents concerning the Anglo-French Policy of Extending the War. Full Text of White Book No. 5

By German Library of Information; Germany Ausweartiges Amt, Prussia Grosser Generalstab, German Library of Information (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview

PREFATORY NOTE TO THE AMERICAN EDITION

White Book No. 5, entitled Further Documents Concerning the Anglo- French Policy of Extending the War, was issued in German and in English by the Foreign Office in Berlin. Owing to the blockade of the mails imposed by Great Britain in violation of international law, neither edition is available in the United States. The present edition, prepared for the benefit of historical students in America, is an authorized translation of the German original and a faithful reproduction in facsimile of documents which fell into the hands of the German troops in their swift advance through Holland and Belgium. It includes in addition the statement of the German General Staff of May 4, 1940, and the German Memorandum to the Dutch and Belgian Governments of May 10, 1940. The evidence presented in the White Book itself corroborates and supplements the allegations of the German Government and the General Staff.

Long before the actual invasion, comprehensive investigations by the General Staff had revealed the connivance of Dutch and Belgian Government authorities with Allied espionage centers and the Allied High Command. The object of the conspiracy was the overthrow of the German Government and the perpetuation of the intolerable condition existing on the Continent due to the incessant interferences of Great Britain. Observations on German troop movements, military maps and secret data circulated freely between military authorities of the Lowlands and the Anglo-French Allies.

These intrigues had been going on, in one form or another, for a considerable time. Finally the day came when England advised the Belgian and Dutch Governments to expect the immediate landing of British troops on their territory in accordance with the prearranged plan. But the German High Command was not asleep. The day after the advices in question were received, German armed forces entered the Lowlands and occupied the vital points through which the Allies intended to make their thrust. Joachim von Ribbentrop, the German Foreign Minister, in a statement to the press, explained the action taken by the German Government to protect its own interests and the neutrality of the Low Countries.

-vii-

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