Allied Intrigue in the Low Countries: Further Documents concerning the Anglo-French Policy of Extending the War. Full Text of White Book No. 5

By German Library of Information; Germany Ausweartiges Amt, Prussia Grosser Generalstab, German Library of Information (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
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SUMMARY

The secret plans of the Western Powers to extend the war to the smaller neutral countries were exposed to the public for the first time on April 14, 1940, by the German Foreign Minister, in his address to the Diplomatic Corps and the domestic and foreign press in Berlin.

On the very day of the German Minister's revelations, Norway was being prepared as a theater of war through Britain's long laid schemes. But the well-conceived policy of the Western Powers was not limited to this Norwegian adventure, because not much later--early in May, 1940--the German Government heard of Franco-British plans for an advance into the German industrial district of the Ruhr. This advance was to be made possible through the connivance and cooperation of Holland and Belgium. Preludes to this move were the threatening notes and speeches the Allies directed to neutral countries, particularly Holland and Belgium. The Western Powers found in the rulers of these countries and their political organs, willing tools to carry out this policy of invasion and attack.

On May 10, 1940, the Memorandum addressed to the Belgian and Dutch Governments was published by the German Government, together with a report from the High Army Command.1This report/furnished documentary evidence of General Staff conversations between Britain and France on the one hand and Belgium and Holland on the other hand. The primary object of these conversations among the General Staffs of the aforementioned countries was to perfect plans for an Allied advance across Belgium, Dutch and Luxemburg territory into the German Ruhr district.

Obviously these conversations of world-shaking import were held in secrecy and, as obviously, they were never intended to become general knowledge. But even high military secrets have a way of leaking out. As far back as March 6, 1936, as was later disclosed, the Belgian Minister for Foreign Affairs and the French Ambassador to that country stationed in Brussels, confirmed that their respective governments were determined to

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1
Although not a part of the official White Book No. 5, the Memorandum and the Statement of the General Staff have been inserted after the Summary for the benefit of the American reader.

-xi-

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