Horace Greeley: Printer, Editor, Crusader

By Henry Luther Stoddard | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
"I Do No Man's Bidding"

ONCE MORE Thurlow Weed stood in the forefront of Greeley's too solicitous friends. Only four months had elapsed since he replied to Weed -- "I only want a chance to think for myself." That was difficult for anyone to do whenever Weed thought differently, and Greeley was now far out of line. Weed devoted a whole evening to warning him again of the futility of his Fourierism. It was the last time that he ever attempted to control him, for following the politician back to Albany was this plain-spoken declaration of independence!

New York, September 10, 1842

Friend Weed:

I rise from a bed of sleepless thought to make plain my position to you. I trust it is now understood, as I thought it had been before, that we differ radically on the Bank bill and I begin to fear we do on the general policy and objects of political controversy. . . . You have been pleased on several occasions to take me to task for differing from you, as though such differences were an evidence not merely of weakness on my part but of some black ingratitude or heartless treachery.

I cannot realize that there have been any series of obligations between us which render it proper in you to assume so complete a mastery over my opinions and actions. I am sure I never desired offices of distinction, avenues to fortune at your hands.

You sought me out for our first interview and if I have not been as useful to you as to me the fault has been through my want of ability. I have given you and I have been ever ready to give you any service

-87-

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