Horace Greeley: Printer, Editor, Crusader

By Henry Luther Stoddard | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXX
The Last Days

BACK AT HIS desk in the Tribune office before noon of the day following his defeat was Greeley, eager in spirit but not equal to effort. There could be no doubt of the imperative need for rest. In the Tribune of November 8 he published "A Card" signed "Horace Greeley." These were the last words from his pen ever to appear in its columns. Thirty-one years and seven months earlier he had published "A Card" in the Log Cabin, announcing the coming of the Tribune. What a record he could look back upon!

His 1872 card read:

The undersigned resumes the editorship of The Tribune, which he relinquished on embarking on another line of business six months ago. Henceforth it shall be his endeavor to make this a thoroughly independent journal, treating all parties and political movements with judicial fairness and candor, but courting the favor and deprecating the wrath of no one. If he can hereafter say anything that will tend to heartily unite the whole American people on the broad platform of Universal Amnesty and Impartial Suffrage, he will gladly do so. For the present, however, he can best command that consummation by silence and forbearance. The victors in our late struggle can hardly fail to take the whole subject of southern rights and wrongs into early and earnest consideration, and to them, for the present, he remits it.

Since he will never again be a candidate for any office, and is not now in full accord with either of the great parties which have hitherto divided the country, he will be able and will endeavor to give wider and

-317-

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