Prophecy and Power among the Dogrib Indians

By June Helm | Go to book overview

Orthography

The few Dogrib words in the text are rendered in the workaday orthography, not consistently phonemic or phonetic, of my ethnographic field notes. The only symbols that do not have an approximately comparable sound or usage in English are:

c as in English chip.
n indicates nasalization of the vowel(s) that immediately precede
it, as in French chanson; n between vowels is sounded as a
consonant, as in Dogrib inin 'spirit.'
š as in English ship.
x as in Spanish jarro.
z as in French azure.
' indicates glottalization of the preceding consonant or consonant
cluster.

Tone is not indicated, nor is word-initial glottal stop.

-xiv-

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Prophecy and Power among the Dogrib Indians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xii
  • Orthography xiv
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - Three Styles in the Practice of Prophecy 5
  • 1 - Prelude to Prophecy 7
  • 2 - Message, Performance, and Persona 27
  • 3 - The Foundations of Prophecy 52
  • Part Two - Ink'On 73
  • 4 - One Man's Ink'On 75
  • 5 - Aspects of Ink'On 80
  • 6 - The Highest Men for Ink'On"" 101
  • 7 - Ink'On in Play and Legend 121
  • 8 - Vital Thomas: A Brief Autobiography 146
  • Appendix 155
  • Notes 158
  • References 164
  • Personal Name Index 169
  • In Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians *
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