The Psychology of Touch

By Morton A. Heller; William Schiff | Go to book overview

PART III
TACTILE PATTERN PERCEPTION

This part of the book is about tactile pattern perception. Most of us tend to think about the performatory role of the hands, that is, we focus on the use of the hands for action and manipulation of objects. However, all of us make use of the sense of touch to obtain information about the shapes of objects we manipulate, and for the detection of two-dimensional patterns. We use our hands while typing on a computer keyboard, and rely on our proprioceptive/spatial "knowledge" about the layout of the keys to permit typing. We can tell when we have hit a key through auditory and tactile feedback. It should be clear that we may know the position of the keys, even though we might not be able to provide oral directions for their location on the board. Nonetheless, we have no difficulty accurately typing while looking at the CRT screen with foveal vision. Very blurry peripheral vision of the keyboard remains, of course, but it is insufficient for identification of the key names. Thus, we often take haptic/tactual skills for granted, while the focus of our attention is directed toward visual matters.

The first chapter in this part, by Appelle, is concerned with pattern perception per se. Most of the research in this field has involved two-dimensional arrays. It is certainly hard to know how much of this information will generalize to three-dimensional configurations, as some researchers believe that the sense of touch is better suited for apprehension of solid, 3-D configurations. We will return to this issue in the concluding chapter of this volume, but we should point out that the study of tactile illusions leads to a general caution in this area. Touch and vision are affected rather differently by orient

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The Psychology of Touch
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • References x
  • References xi
  • Chapter 1 Introduction 1
  • Part I Sensory Phenomena 21
  • References 22
  • Chapter 2 Sensory and Physiological Bases of Touch 23
  • References 55
  • Chapter 3 Thermal Sensibility 61
  • References 87
  • Chapter 14 Pain Responsiveness 91
  • References 111
  • References 112
  • Part II Development and Intermodal Relations 115
  • References 117
  • Chapter 5 Intermodality Relations: Vision and Touch 119
  • References 135
  • Chapter 6 the Development of Haptic Perception During Infancy 139
  • Part III Tactile Pattern Perception 163
  • References 166
  • Chapter 7 Haptic Perception of Form: Activity and Stimulus Attributes 169
  • Chapter 8 Vibrotactile Pattern Perception: Some Findings and Applications 189
  • References 213
  • Chapter 9 Braille 219
  • References 235
  • References 238
  • Chapter 10 Haptic Perception in Blind People 239
  • Chapter 11 Tactile Pictures 263
  • References 296
  • Chapter 12 a Reversed Lag in the Recognition and Production of Tactual Drawings: Theoretical Implications for Haptic Coding 301
  • References 323
  • Chapter 13 Conclusions: the Future of Touch 327
  • References 336
  • Author Index 339
  • Subject Index 349
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