Aspects of the Development of Competence

By W. Andrew Collins; Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology | Go to book overview

The foregoing chapter reviews the results of a contemporaneous psychological inquiry into the question of perceptual organization and endeavors to catalog some of the ways in which two kinds of perceptual organization lend structure to otherwise little organized and persistently novel experiences near the beginning of life. This line of investigation suggests that organisms are naturally biased to generalize over physical variation of particular sorts and to attend selectively to certain kinds of information. Classification is a central theme of long-standing appeal in philosophy and the psychology of sense perception; and, attention has long been recognized to be a gateway to perception, thought, and action. These twin characteristics of perceptual organization help the child go beyond elementary units of sensing to perceiving with understanding; further, they provide one solution for the developmental "problem of structure" as Bruner ( 1978, p. 1354) has termed it: "If we must already know something in order to learn anything, how do we get started learning at all?" In memory of Mollie Pepper, who effected her own transitions.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Research reported in this chapter was partially supported by the Spencer Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. I wish to express much gratitude to Helen Bornstein, Nancy Cantor, Charles Gross, William Kessen, and Diane Ruble for constructive criticism of earlier versions of this chapter, and to Kay Ferdinandsen, Arlene Kronewitter, and Mary Ann Opperman for invaluable aid in preparing the manuscript.


REFERENCES

Anglin, J. M. Word, object, and conceptual development. New York: Norton, 1977.

Appelle, S. "Perception and discrimination as a function of stimulus orientation: The oblique effect in man and animals". Psychological Bulletin, 1972, 78, 266-278.

Aristotle. Metaphysica. In J. A. Smith & W. D Ross (Eds.), The works of Aristotle (Vol. 8). Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1908.

Arnheim, R. Art and visual perception. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1974.

Aslin, R. N., & Pisoni, D. B. Some developmental processes in speech perception. In G. Yeni- Komshian , J. F. Kavanaugh, & C. A. Ferguson (Eds.), Child phonology: Perception and production. New York: Academic Press, 1980.

Attneave, F. "Physical determinants of the judged complexity of shapes". Journal of Experimental Psychology, 1957, 53, 221-227. (a)

Attneave, F. "Transfer of experience with a class-schema to identification-learning of patterns and shapes". Journal of Experimental Psychology, 1957, 54, 81-88. (b)

Attneave, F. "Triangles as ambiguous figures". American Journal of Psychology, 1968, 81, 447-453.

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aspects of the Development of Competence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 278

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.