Old Testament History

By Henry Preserved Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV
JOSIAH AND HIS SONS

WHAT was said above about the influence of the harem upon a young prince would seem to apply with equal force to Josiah, for he was only eight years old when he came to the throne ( B.C. 637). Yet Josiah was wholly in the hands of the reforming party. We might account for this partly by recalling what was said about the crown prince being in the party of opposition. But we do not know that Josiah was the heir apparent. He seems to have been made king by a popular movement in opposition to a strong party at court. While Manasseh was violently reintroducing ancient abuses, it is reasonable to suppose that some even of his own family were unwilling to go his lengths. The reformers, making quiet propaganda among the people, had means of approaching the court. The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the Church, and from those put to death for their fidelity to their convictions some voice might penetrate as far as the king's harem. The priest Hilkiah seems to have been one of the reformers, and we may suppose him one of the thoughtful men to whom the writings of Isaiah and the story of his life would make a strong appeal.

We are told nothing of the reign of Josiah till his eighteenth year, when there occurred an event of the first importance not only for his time but for all succeeding ages. This was the finding of the Book of Instruction.1 The Biblical account is to the effect that in Josiah's eighteenth year he sent his secretary, Shaphan, to take account of the money in the collection-box in the Temple-we have already learned of the arrangement made by Jehoash.2 Shaphan was to act as inspector, while Hilkiah made

____________________
1
This is the name by which the book is called in the Biblical account ( 2 Kings, 223-13), and we may conveniently retain the title. The later Jews applied the same name ( Sepher ha-Tora) to the whole Pentateuch, which however, wemay call the Book of Law in order to avoid confusion.
2
2 Kings, 124-16. The account of the finding of the book is in 2 Kings, 223-20

-260-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Old Testament History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chapter I - The Sources 1
  • Chapter II - The Origins 11
  • Chapter III - The Patriarchs 35
  • Chapter IV - Egypt and the Desert 52
  • Chapter V - The Conquest 73
  • Chapter VI - The Heroes 87
  • Chapter VII - The Early Monarchy 106
  • Chapter VIII - David 129
  • Chapter IX - Solomon 156
  • Chapter X - From Jeroboam to Jehu 177
  • Chapter XI - The House of Jehu 198
  • Chapter XII - The Fall of Samaria 219
  • Chapter XIII - Hezekiah and Manasseh 238
  • Chapter XIV - Josiah and His Sons 260
  • Chapter XV - The Exile 301
  • Chapter XVI - The Rebuilding of the Temple 344
  • Chapter XVII - Nehemiah and After 382
  • Chapter XVIII - The Greek Period 413
  • Chapter XX - The Priest-Kings 470
  • Appendix - Chronological Table 499
  • Index of Subjects 503
  • Index of Scripture Passages 510
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 522

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.