Risky Business? Pac Decisionmaking in Congressional Elections

By Robert Biersack; Paul S. Herrnson et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Part One Lead PACs

Some PACs attempt to influence the contributions of others by providing information and other cues. These lead PACs are generally older, larger, and more institutionalized than other PACs. At least part of their behavior during an election cycle consists of gathering and disseminating information on the positions and prospects of candidates. Beyond these similarities, however, there is a fair amount of diversity among lead PACs. We have chosen four in this section to represent the most important broad types of committees. The Committee on Political Education (COPE) and the Business and Industry Political Action Committee (BIPAC) represent traditional economic interests and have parent organizations as sponsors. They provide cues to labor union and business committees. The National Committee for an Effective Congress (NCEC) and the Free Congress PAC represent a broad spectrum of ideological concerns and have no parent organizations. They provide cues to ideological PACs of the right and left. Other PACs in this volume may also serve as lead PACs within more narrowly defined communities.

Although lead PACs attempt to influence the contribution behavior of other PACs, they cannot safely assume that other PACs sharing their economic or ideological perspective will merely follow their example and direction. Rather, lead PACs must make substantial efforts to exert some influence on the flow of campaign money. Most lead PACs assign ratings to members of Congress based on their roll-call voting and other legislative behavior, and many assign ratings to nonincumbent candidates based on their responses to surveys. Most send newsletters and memos about the status of specific contests to other allied committees. They also issue press releases and grant interviews to journalists and reporters who work for specialized publications, such as the Political Report and the Cook Political Report, which serve the Washington, D.C., political community. As the election cycle gets under way, lead PACs hold briefings with increasing fre

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Risky Business? Pac Decisionmaking in Congressional Elections
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?