British Friends of the American Revolution

By Jerome R. Reich | Go to book overview

hostile part against them." 57 Moreover, Cartwright, when invited to enter the naval service of the United States, refused on the grounds that "nothing could absolve a man from the duty he owed his own country." 58 John Cartwright spent the remainder of his long and productive life doing his duty to his country by spearheading the cause of parliamentary reform.


Notes
1.
The major sources on Pownall's life include John A. Schultz Thomas Pownall -- British Defender of American Liberty and the older Charles A. W. Pownall volume, Thomas Pownall.
2.
Thomas Pownall, The Administration of the British Colonies, 5th ed., contains the full text of this proposal. Hereafter referred to as Administration of Colonies.
3.
Albert H. Smyth, ed., The Writings of Benjamin Franklin, III, pp. 358-366.
4.
Charles Francis Adams, ed., The Works of John Adams, IV, p. 21. Adams still wrote effusively about Pownall in 1817. See vol. X, pp. 241-243.
5.
T. Pownall, Administration of Colonies, I, p. 10. A more detailed analysis of this work may be found in G. H. Guttridge article in the William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., XXVI ( January 1969): 31-46, and the chapter by John Shy, "Thomas Pownall, Henry Ellis, and the Spectrum of Possibilities, 1763-1775" in Anglo-American Political Relations, 1675-1775, ed. A. G. Olson and R. M. Brown, pp. 155-186.
6.
T. Pownall, Administration of Colonies, I, p. 40.
10.
The best modern sources for Tucker's life and thought are Robert Livingstone Schuyler , ed., Josiah Tucker. A Selection from His Economic and Political Writings, and Walter E. Clark, Josiah Tucker: Economist.
11.
Schuyler, Josiah Tucker, pp. 11-17.
12.
Josiah Tucker, Four Letters on important National Subjects; Addressed to the Right Honorable the Earl of Shelburne, p. 2.
13.
Josiah Tucker, Four Tracts on Political and Commercial Subjects, 2d ed., p. 96.
23.
Josiah Tucker, The Respective Pleas and Arguments of the Mother Country and of the Colonies, Distinctly Set Forth: and the Impossibility of a Compromise of Differences or a Mutual Concession of Rights Plainly Demonstrated, pp. iii-iv.

-19-

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