McTeague: A Story of San Francisco

By Frank Norris; Jerome Loving | Go to book overview

VII

'WHAT nonsense!' answered Trina.

'Ach Gott! What is ut?' cried Mrs Sieppe, misunderstanding, supposing a calamity.

'What--what--what,' stammered the dentist, confused by the lights, the crowded stairway, the medley of voices. The party reached the landing. The others surrounded them. Marcus alone seemed to rise to the occasion.

'Le' me be the first to congratulate you,' he cried, catching Trina's hand. Every one was talking at once.

'Miss Sieppe, Miss Sieppe, your ticket has won five thousand dollars,' cried Maria. 'Don't you remember the lottery ticket I sold you in Doctor McTeague's office?'

'Trina!' almost screamed her mother. 'Five tausend thalers! five tausend thalers! If popper were only here!'

'What is it--what is it?' exclaimed McTeague, rolling his eyes.

'What are you going to do with it, Trina?' inquired Marcus.

'You're a rich woman, my dear,' said Miss Baker, her little false curls quivering with excitement, 'and I'm glad for your sake. Let me kiss you. To think I was in the room when you bought the ticket!'

'Oh, oh!' interrupted Trina, shaking her head, 'there is a mistake. There must be. Why--why should I win five thousand dollars? It's nonsense!'

'No mistake, no mistake,' screamed Maria. 'Your number was 400,012. Here it is in the paper this evening. I remember it well, because I keep an account.'

'But I know you're wrong,' answered Trina, beginning to tremble in spite of herself. 'Why should I win?'

'Eh? Why shouldn't you?' cried her mother.

In fact, why shouldn't she? The idea suddenly occurred to Trina. After all, it was not a question of effort or merit on her part. Why should she suppose a mistake? What if it

-87-

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McTeague: A Story of San Francisco
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Note on the Text xxix
  • Select Bibliography xxx
  • A Chronology of Frank Norris xxxii
  • I 5
  • II 15
  • III 30
  • IV 42
  • V 52
  • VI 71
  • VII 87
  • VIII 103
  • IX 119
  • X 142
  • XI 164
  • XII 185
  • XIII 198
  • XIV 208
  • XV 218
  • XVI 232
  • XVII 246
  • XVIII 252
  • XIX 268
  • XX 289
  • XXI 298
  • XXII 327
  • Explanatory Notes 337
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