The Whig Party in the South

By Arthur Charles Cole | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII.
THE ELECTION OF 1852.

The Whig national convention convened at Baltimore on June 16. The southern delegates arrived on the ground early, after a series of conferences at Washington where many of them had stopped to survey the situation. They were prepared to carry out the program which they had planned. On the evening of the fifteenth and on the following morning, a caucus of southern delegates, over which John G. Chapman of Maryland presided, agreed upon a series of resolutions, the adoption of which in a platform for the Whig party was to be made the condition of their continued participation in the deliberations of the convention.1

The contest with the northern Whigs was begun somewhat inauspiciously, for the southerners failed to secure a temporary chairman of their own choice, although they tried, with this very object, to forestall the northern delegates by calling the meeting to order a quarter of an hour before the appointed time.2 The

____________________
1
National Intelligencer, June 17; New York Herald, June 17 (all dates are of 1852 unless otherwise indicated). The authorship of these resolutions has been ascribed to Webster or his friends. Stephens, Constitutional. View, II, 237-238. At the time, however, they were regarded as of southern Whig origin and were believed to be the work of Humphrey Marshall. See Philadelphia North American, June 17; Louisville Journal, July 2, citing New York Express. Etheridge, a Tennessee Whig, stated definitely before the House, May 17, 1854, that the finality resolution "was penned by a southern gentleman (Mr. Humphrey Marshall, of Kentucky) ". Cong. Globe, 33 Cong., 1 sess., Appendix, 835.
2
New York Herald, June 17.

-245-

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