The Landscape Painting of China and Japan

By Hugo Munsterberg | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

It would be impossible to list all those who in one way or another have been of help to me in my study of Chinese and Japanese landscape painting, for this work has been possible only through the labors of my colleagues, both Western and Oriental. However I wish to acknowledge above all my indebtedness to my teachers at Harvard University, Professor Benjamin Rowland and Mr. Laurence Sickman, with whom I studied Chinese painting and Mr. Langdon Warner, under whom I studied Japanese painting.

No one working in this field can do so without drawing heavily upon the scholarship of Professor Osvald Siren whose books on Chinese painting and translations from Chinese texts have been of immeasurable help in my studies. The same may be said of the translations undertaken by Professor Alexander Soper and Miss Shio Sakanishi, and to them I wish to express my thanks for letting me quote from their writings.

I wish to thank the private collectors and museums who have been kind enough to permit me to draw upon their material for the illustrations in this book, especially Mr. John Pope of the Freer Gallery of Art in Washington, Mr. Robert Paine of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Mr. Laurence Sickman of the Nelson Gallery in Kansas City, Miss Hiroko Kojima of the National Museum in Tokyo, Miss Akiko Ueno of Bijutsu Kenkyujō, and Dr. Victoria Contag of the University of Mainz. Finally, I am deeply indebted to my wife, whose help and advice has been a tremendous asset throughout the writing of this book; it may indeed be said that it would not have been written without her aid and encouragement.

Hugo Munsterberg

-vii-

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The Landscape Painting of China and Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • About the Author *
  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Note viii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Plates xi
  • The Landscape Painting of China 1
  • 1 - The Spirit of Chinese Landscape Painting 3
  • 2 - The Beginnings of Chinese Landscape Painting 13
  • 3 - The T'Ang Period 19
  • 4 - The Fire Dynasties and Early Sung Periods 31
  • 5 - The Northern Sung Period 43
  • 6 - The Southern Sung Period 51
  • 7 - The Yüan Period 59
  • 8 - The Ming Period 65
  • 9 - The Ch'Ing Period 73
  • The Landscape Painting of Japan 79
  • 10 - The Beginnings of Landscape Painting in Japan 81
  • 11 - The Heian and Kamakura Periods 87
  • 12 - The Muromachi Period 95
  • 13 - The Momoyama Period 105
  • 14 - The Edo Period 111
  • 15 - Landscape Painters of the Ukiyo-E School 121
  • Notes 129
  • Bibliography 135
  • Index 139
  • Plates 145
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