The Landscape Painting of China and Japan

By Hugo Munsterberg | Go to book overview

12
The Muromachi Period

UNDER the impact of Zen Buddhism, which during the Muromachi, or Ashikaga, period ( 1333-1573) enjoyed a tremendous popularity in Japan, the art of the landscape flourished as never before. Not only did Zen monks bring back Sung and Yüan landscape scrolls from the Chinese mainland, but also Japancse painters such as Sesshū visited China to study her art. Like the Southern Sung period, the Muromachi was an age of political unrest, yet in the very midst of the decline there was a wonderful flowering of the arts. Monuments such as the Golden Pavilion, or Kinkaku-ji, built by the Ashikaga Shogun Yoshimitsu, are a testament to the brilliance of the age, and the beautiful gardens, the cult of the tea ceremony, and above all, the wonderful monochrome ink paintings are all evidence of the highly developed taste. The eighth Ashikaga Shogun, Yoshimasa, was an illustrious patron of the arts, and the catalogue of his magnificent collection, the Kintaikan Sayūchōki, which was compiled by Sōami and contains a description of the shogun's paintings and ceramics, is still studied today.

The cultural dependence upon China was so great during this period that Chinese pictures, imported in large numbers, were "frequently used as gifts, given and received for the promotion of social intercourse. Especially, it was customary that the tribute offered to the Shogun must always include pictures, and these pictures were almost always those imported from China,

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The Landscape Painting of China and Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • About the Author *
  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Note viii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Plates xi
  • The Landscape Painting of China 1
  • 1 - The Spirit of Chinese Landscape Painting 3
  • 2 - The Beginnings of Chinese Landscape Painting 13
  • 3 - The T'Ang Period 19
  • 4 - The Fire Dynasties and Early Sung Periods 31
  • 5 - The Northern Sung Period 43
  • 6 - The Southern Sung Period 51
  • 7 - The Yüan Period 59
  • 8 - The Ming Period 65
  • 9 - The Ch'Ing Period 73
  • The Landscape Painting of Japan 79
  • 10 - The Beginnings of Landscape Painting in Japan 81
  • 11 - The Heian and Kamakura Periods 87
  • 12 - The Muromachi Period 95
  • 13 - The Momoyama Period 105
  • 14 - The Edo Period 111
  • 15 - Landscape Painters of the Ukiyo-E School 121
  • Notes 129
  • Bibliography 135
  • Index 139
  • Plates 145
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