Transformation: The Story of Modern Puerto Rico

By Earl Parker Hanson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXI
Migration

AT THE BEGINNING enth century, when the French began to have serious troubles with their Haitian slaves, a number of Frenchmen left Haiti to re-establish themselves in Spain's peaceful colony of Puerto Rico. After the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, many Creoles, Frenchmen, and Spaniards left the affected teritory and moved to Puerto Rico to escape being ruled by the Protestant, Republican United States. For decades after the outbreak of the Latin American revolutionary wars, beginning with Miranda's illfated expedition from New York to Venezuela in 1806 and ending with the establishment of the various Latin American republics in the 1820's, thousands of Spanish royalists left the revolting Spanish colonies and sought refuge in royalist Puerto Rico. Many Corsicans came after Napoleon's fall.

The flow of people was in those days into Puerto Rico. The island's population grew dramatically, swelled constantly by newcomers. For varying reasons, but centuries after the 1530's, when the governor thought it necessary to threaten the death penalty for anybody who was so inflamed by the news of Pizarro's exploits in Peru that he wanted to leave and get in on the conquest and the loot, relatively few Puerto Ricans left their island. Most of them were always desperately poor,

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Transformation: The Story of Modern Puerto Rico
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Right Shall Again Prevail v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xv
  • Chapter I - Transformation 1
  • Chapter II - The Colony 21
  • Chapter III - The Anguish of Colonialism 40
  • Chapter IV - Colonialism Bankrupt 61
  • Chapter V - Tragic Lunacy 77
  • Chapter VI - Growth of a Leader 94
  • Chapter VII - Lobbyist 116
  • Chapter VIII - Reconstruction 135
  • Chapter IX - Disintegration 152
  • Chapter X - 1940 172
  • Chapter XI - Tugwell 190
  • Chapter XIII - Neither Radical nor Conservative 227
  • Chapter XV - Power and Industry 266
  • Chapter XVI - The Tourist Industry 284
  • Chapter XVII - Public Health 300
  • Chapter XVIII - Education 317
  • Chapter XIX - Civic Employment 336
  • Chapter XX - Culture Changes and The Population Problem 351
  • Chapter XXI - Migration 366
  • Chapter XXII - Where Now? 382
  • Index 405
  • About the Author 417
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