Hitler's Death Camps: The Sanity of Madness

By Konnilyn G. Feig | Go to book overview

THE
PRE-WAR
CAMPS

DACHAU: A PERFECT MODEL

Dachau is the show camp of Western Europe. Although Nazi concentration camps dotted the continent, only one small camp on the western side of the Iron Curtain has been preserved with the intent of serving as a major visitor, education, and memorial center. Certainly, some improvements have been made at Natzweiler and Flossenbürg, and some tiny, almost offhand attempts at Neuengamme and Bergen-Belsen. But those efforts came from concerned survivors, not from the government or the German people. The West German government has put all its eggs in the Dachau basket, albeit reluctantly.

Dachau was Himmler's model camp, so why not make it a model museum? For years after the war it languished, dismal and decrepit, until survivors joined together to protest and various religious groups began to erect monuments. If an American tourist or a Western European has toured any camp, it is Dachau. And if American soldiers talked of a camp they had liberated or visited, it was usually Dachau. The American Army liberated Mauthausen, Buchenwald, Dora/ Nordhausen, and Dachau. But only two of those camps now lie in Western Europe. The situation contrasts with the picture in Eastern Europe. True, East Germany has its show camp at Buchenwald and Poland has its at Auschwitz. Yet the East Germans also expended large sums of money to preserve Ravensbriick and Sachsenhausen, and the Poles built important museums at Majdanek and Stutthof. And both countries urge visitors to tour those major camps. Of course, the Poles much prefer that no one travel to the four killing centers, but at least if one manages to locate them, one finds in three instances a significant memorial park with sculpture by reputable artists.

No, the West German government has never been eager to preserve or highlight its camps, not even Dachau. And the people of that gray provincial town preferred that the camp be destroyed. But pressure from survivors mounted, and fifteen years after the war the Germans began work on Dachau. What they have created is a monstrosity. Other nations have some contrasts, some alternatives.

Dachau, only 15 kilometers northwest of Munich, is easy to reach. With

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hitler's Death Camps: The Sanity of Madness
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Camp Names and Locations xiii
  • Preface xix
  • Part One - A Beginning 1
  • Part Two - The Camps 41
  • The Pre-War Camps - Dachau: a Perfect Model 43
  • The Polish Camps 191
  • The German Camps 209
  • The Czechoslovakian Center 234
  • The Killing Centersexclusive Function Camps 266
  • The Labor/ Extermination Complexes 313
  • Liberation 370
  • Poland 394
  • Part Three - The Indifferent the SlaughterÉrs the Strugglers 405
  • Appendix I - Camp Directions 447
  • Appendix II - The Camps and Commandants 451
  • Appendix III - The Fate of the Commandants 455
  • Notes 461
  • Sources 503
  • Bibliography 506
  • Index 533
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 547

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.