Evolution, Genetics, and Man

By Theodosius Dobzhansky | Go to book overview

1
Nature and Origin of Life

The purpose of science is twofold. Science strives, in the first place, to understand man and the universe of which he is a part. In the second place, science endeavors to provide man with the means to control his environment. The quest for understanding is a function of theoretical, fundamental, or pure science. Knowledge and understanding are sources of satisfaction even when they do not yield any immediate material benefits. Control of the environment is a function of applied science or technology.

Understanding things, however, is the surest approach to controlling them; and the distinction between pure and applied science is, therefore, not always sharp. This distinction often describes the attitudes of mind of investigators and students rather than the subject matter of their investigations and studies. Some discoveries of greatest practical utility have been made by scientists engaged in exploration of the laws of nature without regard for their possible utilization. For instance, the germ theory of disease and much of the modern food technology are outgrowths of the studies of the great French biologist Pasteur ( 1822-1895) on the nature of life.

Cosmic Evolution . Discoveries made in various branches of science during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries have converged to establish an evolutionary approach to the understanding of nature. The universe has not always been as it is now. Nature as we observe it today is the outcome of a historical process of development, evolution. The human race with its social, intellectual, and artistic achievements, the world of living creatures, and inanimate nature, all evolved gradually and by stages from very different antecedents.

The classical atomist view of nature, which dominated physical sci-

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Evolution, Genetics, and Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.