Entrepreneurs in High Technology: Lessons from MIT and Beyond

By Edward B. Roberts | Go to book overview

At the source organizations the entrepreneurs significantly out produced their technical colleagues along the conventional output measures of papers and patents. Many had already risen into technical supervisory roles. Indeed, starting a company might be just another avenue for the productive energies and knowledge of these outstanding people.

Their work backgrounds evidence that not only are entrepreneurs more likely to come from engineering rather than science, but especially from the developmental (not research) end of the R&D work spectrum. Translating technology into use is more likely to spawn entrepreneurs than is the more basic creation of new technical knowledge. Going from a challenging and satisfying work environment in search of still further challenge is typical of most technical entrepreneurs.

Technical professionals who are considering starting a company should also gain comfort from the wide diversity of goals, personalities and motives included among actual technical entrepreneurs. From a personality perspective, technical entrepreneurs are likely to be more extroverted than their rather introverted technical colleagues. As a group they represent extremes in orientation to both intuitive and analytic thought processes, both dimensions already strong among engineers and scientists. The technical entrepreneur is also perceiving oriented, generating a personality profile that Keirsey and Bates have rather aptly (for many) labeled the inventor.

Motivational studies show wide ranges of basic needs within the technical entrepreneur population. Despite the fact that all those studied are indeed entrepreneurs, they do not all have high need for achievement, although of course some do. The median technical entrepreneur has moderate need for achievement, moderate need for power, and low need for affiliation.

Most technical entrepreneurs seem to be fulfilling a long felt need (or at least ambition) in starting their companies, reflecting at least several years of prior general contemplation about going into their own businesses. But when asked to state why, these technical entrepreneurs reveal primarily a heavy orientation toward independence, being their own boss, some reflection of a continuing search for new and bolder challenges, and considerably less focus on financial gains than might be expected by cynical observers of entrepreneurs. More specifics about precipitating events in forming the business are discussed in the next chapter.


Notes
1.
The psychological profiles of the 54 entrepreneurs in this sample were first compared with data on the U.S. general population. On a statistically significant basis the group of technical entrepreneurs is more introverted (1) (p =.10), more intuitive (N) (p=.05), and more thinking-oriented (T) (p=.05) than the general population, and not different in judging preference (J). Indeed

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Entrepreneurs in High Technology: Lessons from MIT and Beyond
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter 1 High-Technology Entrepreneurs 3
  • References 30
  • Chapter 2 an Environment for Entrepreneurs 31
  • References 45
  • Chapter 3 the Makings of an Entrepreneur 47
  • Summary and Implications 94
  • Notes 96
  • References 97
  • Chapter 4 the Technological Base of the New Enterprise 100
  • Summary and Implications 121
  • References 123
  • Chapter 5 the Financial Base of the New Enterprise 124
  • Summary and Implications 156
  • Chapter 6 Evolving Toward Product and Market-Orientation 160
  • Notes 186
  • References 186
  • Chapter 7 Finding Additional Financing 188
  • References 215
  • Chapter 8 Going Public 217
  • Summary and Implications: Sizzle or Steak 242
  • References 244
  • Chapter 9 Survival Versus Success 245
  • Chapter 10 Product Strategy and Corporate Success 281
  • Notes 306
  • References 308
  • Chapter 11 Super-Success 309
  • Notes 336
  • References 338
  • Chapter 12 Technological Entrepreneurship: Birth, Growth, and Success 339
  • References 358
  • Appendix a Quarter Century of Research 359
  • References 375
  • Index of Founders and Firms 377
  • Subject Index 381
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 390

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.