Jonathan Edwards and the Limits of Enlightenment Philosophy

By Leon Chai | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I WOULD LIKE TO THANK Frederick Schmitt, first of all, for his careful reading of an early version of chapter 1. His detailed comments and helpful conversational remarks were my initiation into the scholarship on Enlightenment philosophy.

Similarly, Philip Gura and Donald Weber provided useful suggestions about recent Edwards scholarship when I was about to begin my own project.

At a later stage, I benefitted much from the transcriptions of Edwards's "Miscellanies" prepared by Thomas Schafer. But I also owe an equal debt of gratitude to the warm hospitality and kind offices of Thomas and Eudora Schafer, without whom my admittedly partial investigation of this massive portion of the Edwards manuscripts would not have been possible.

I would also like to acknowledge the National Endowment for the Humanities, whose support in the form of a fellowship for 1991-92 gave me the leisure necessary for composition of an initial draft of the work, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for a sabbatical leave during which I managed to complete the revision.

At Oxford University Press, Cynthia Read helped to shepherd my book through the submission process. In addition, the two anonymous readers for the press offered comments that have resulted in what I hope will prove substantial improvements.

Tom Hove performed the labor of preparing a disk copy of the manuscript by means of recent scanner technology. I owe him thanks for his patience and, even more, his friendly generosity.

Finally, Cara Ryan assisted me in innumerable ways throughout the long process by which this book came into existence. Her careful work on the manuscript at the final stage, and her numerous comments and suggestions on various drafts, have helped to make the book significantly better.

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