Home Town News: William Allen White and the Emporia Gazette

By Sally Foreman Griffith | Go to book overview

Notes

Abbreviations
EG Emporia Gazette (daily edition)
ER Emporia Republican
ESU William Allen White Collection, William Allen White Memorial Li-
brary, Emporia State University, Emporia
ET Emporia Times
KU William Allen White Papers, Kansas Collection, Kenneth Spencer Re-
search Library, University of Kansas, Lawrence
LB Letter books included in LC
LC William Allen White Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress,
Washington, D.C.
LCHM Lyon County Historical Museum, Emporia

Introduction
1.
William Allen White, The Autobiography of William Allen White ( New York: Macmillan Company, 1946), pp. 257-58.
2.
For Franklin's account of his arrival, see The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, Leonard W. Labaree et al., eds. ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1964), pp. 75-77. The many biographies of White that focus upon his national career include Walter Johnson, William Allen White's America ( New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1947); Everett Rich, William Allen White: The Man From Emporia ( New York: Farrar & Rinehart, Inc., 1941); Frank C. Clough, William Allen White of Emporia ( New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1941; Greenwood Press reprint, 1970); David Hinshaw, A Man From Kansas: The Story of William Allen White ( New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1945); John DeWitt MeKee, William Allen White: Maverick on Main Street (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1975); and E. Jay Jernigan, William Allen White ( New York: Twayne Publishers, Inc., 1983).
3.
My understanding of face-to-face communication has been greatly influenced by the work of Fr. Walter J. Ong, most recently Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word ( New York: Methuen & Co., 1982). As will become clear, however, I do not follow Fr. Ong's polarization of cultures into oral or literate. Rather, I have come to believe that there is a continuum among and within societies between purely oral and purely literate and that small towns in the nineteenth century had strong oral components. Certainly, journalism as a highly conventional genre has many of the same characteristics that Fr. Ong ascribes to oral expression.

-243-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Home Town News: William Allen White and the Emporia Gazette
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 3
  • Part I - The New Man 11
  • 1 - The Education of a Somebody"" 13
  • 2 - The New Editor 32
  • Part II - The Old Order Changeth 65
  • 3 - A Practical Printer 67
  • 4 - The Making of a Progressive 92
  • 5 - Booster Progressivism 113
  • 6 - Spokesman for Community 139
  • 7 - Community Journalism 159
  • Part III - Nationalizing the Community 185
  • 8 - Booster Nationalism 187
  • 9 - Mass Media Come to the Small Town 211
  • Epilogue 240
  • Notes 243
  • Index 283
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 296

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.