Religion and the American Civil War

By Randall M. Miller; Harry S. Stout et al. | Go to book overview

12
Catholic Religion, Irish Ethnicity, and the Civil War

RANDALL M. MILLER

In 1988, while looking for relics on the Antietam battlefield, a collector happened on in extraordinary discovery. Unearthing a brass hook, ammunition, and buttons at one site, he dug deeper. He found a tooth. The collector and his fellow workers reported the findings to the landowner and then to the National Park Service. Archeologists returned to the spot and eventually uncovered the bones of four Union soldiers, who had been hastily buried and forgotten on September 17, 1862, the bloodiest day of the Civil War. After six years of analysis of the physical remnants and surrounding artifacts, and a thorough combing of historical records, a team of archeologists and anthropologists determined that all of the men had been members of the 63rd New York Infantry, part of the famous Irish Brigade that had covered itself in glory with its gallant charge at Bloody Lane that fateful day in 1862. As one of the men was a private likely in his forties, which was older than most soldiers, his identity could be narrowed down to a choice of three-- James Gallagher, a stonecutter from Kilkenny, Ireland; Martin McMahon, a laborer from County Clue, Ireland; or James McGarigan, an Irish American. That Irishman had died with a rosary looped around his neck, after three bullets smashed his breastbone while the brigade approached the crest of Bloody Lane. His remains and those of his wholly anonymous comrades have since been reburied, after a Catholic Mass, at the National Cemetery at Antietam. 1

This short tale says everything about the problem of writing the history of the Irish Catholics, or any immigrant group, in the Civil War. Although roughly 145,000 Irish Catholics served in the Union army, their experience has been largely forgotten. Ella Lonn's thick volumes on the foreign-born in the Union and Confederate armies and William Burton's more recent treatment

-261-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Religion and the American Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 434

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.