Pseudo-Philo: Rewriting the Bible

By Frederick J. Murphy | Go to book overview

1
Introduction

The Biblical Antiquities of Pseudo-Philo retells the Hebrew Bible from Adam to the death of Saul. Its retelling is quite free and extensive. It does quote the biblical text at times, but more often it paraphrases, condenses, summarizes, omits material, and adds much that has little or no corresponding material in the Bible. Many of the additions take the form of speeches, prayers, and conversations among the characters.

The Biblical Antiquities dates from the first century of the Common Era, probably before the war with the Romans began in 66 C.E. It was written in Jewish Palestine. It is a valuable source for understanding how Jews of first- century Palestine used and retold their sacred stories and for Jewish thought of the late Second Temple period. Because it was transmitted with Latin translations of works by Philo of Alexandria, the Biblical Antiquities was thought to be his. However, Philo and Pseudo-Philo have little in common in their dealings with the biblical text. Furthermore, it is likely that the Biblical Antiquities was originally written in Hebrew, whereas Philo wrote in Greek.1. The work's title, Liber Antiquitatum Biblicarum, first appears in the 1552 edition of Sichardus's text. Its earlier title (from a fourteenth-century manuscript), Liber Antiquitatum, may be in imitation of Josephus Jewish Antiquities.2.


Text, Translation, Biblical Text Type, Language

The Biblical Antiquities survives in "eighteen complete and three fragmentary Latin manuscripts" dating from the eleventh to the fifteenth centuries.3. Daniel Harrington has produced the critical Latin text of the Biblical Antiquities, available in Sources Crétiennes229.4. He has also provided the best English translation, which is used throughout this study and is based on his Latin text.5. The translation stays close to the Latin text, to the point of preserving its

____________________
1.
See OTP, 299-300.
2.
See SC 230, 10.
3.
OTP, 298.
4.
SC 229, 60-386. For a short explanation of the manuscripts and their relationships, see OTP, 298. For a more detailed explanation, SC 229, 15-59.
5.
OTP, 304-77.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pseudo-Philo: Rewriting the Bible
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 324

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.