Roosevelt and Churchill: Their Secret Wartime Correspondence

By Francis L. Loewenheim; Harold D. Langley et al. | Go to book overview

Messages and Notes

Doc. 277
CHURCHILL TO ROOSEVELT

No. 530 January 2, 1944

Hull tells Eden that you have no recollection of any remarks by U.J. about unconditional surrender.1 I certainly heard, with great interest, him saying something to the effect that he thought it might be well to consider telling the Germans at some stage what unconditional surrender would involve, or perhaps what it would not involve. After that we began talking about the 50,000 and your compromise and my high falutin', and I finished up by no means certain that the Germans would be reassured if they were told what he had in mind.2

____________________
1
According to Secretary of State Cordell Hull's memoirs, the British Embassy at Washington sent the State Department an aide-mémoire on December 22, 1943, stating that a joint announcement to the German people based on the principle of unconditional surrender had been considered at Teheran and that Stalin (U.J.) had told Roosevelt on November 29 that he thought this a bad tactic. British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden believed that the matter should be dealt with as soon as possible. Hull asked Roosevelt for his views on December 22 and was told that the subject had not been brought up in Roosevelt's presence at Teheran. The President thought that John G. Winant, the American ambassador to Great Britain, should take the matter up with Churchill as soon as the Prime Minister got back to London. Winant was so instructed on December 24. See Cordell Hull, The Memoirs of Cordell Hull, 2 vols. ( New York, 1948), 2: 1572. Henceforth cited as Hull, Memoirs.
2
Churchill does not mention unconditional surrender in this context in his memoirs but does discuss the viewpoints of the Big Three on the matter of punish-

-410-

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Roosevelt and Churchill: Their Secret Wartime Correspondence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xiii
  • Preface xv
  • General Introduction 1
  • Part I - September 1939 To October 1942 77
  • Introduction to Part I 79
  • Messages and Notes 89
  • Part II - November 1942 To December 1943 265
  • Introduction to Part II 267
  • Messages and Notes 278
  • Part III - January 1944 To June 1944 401
  • Introduction to Part III 403
  • Messages and Notes 410
  • Part IV - June 1944 To April 1945 505
  • Introduction to Part IV 507
  • Messages and Notes 521
  • Chronology 711
  • Maps 739
  • Bibliogaphy (of Works Cited) 749
  • Index 761
  • The Editors 807
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