Arms Akimbo: Africana Women in Contemporary Literature

By Janice Lee Liddell; Yakini Belinda Kemp | Go to book overview

12
Sense Make Befoh Book" Grenadian Popular Culture and the Rhetoric of Revolution in Merle Collins's Angel and The Colour of Forgetting

CAROLYN COOPER

I tell you, the dogs and the spirits did well know and you know, that was long before human hearing anything to make them start bawling. So who know? Perhaps if people had a habit of listening, some other something

Might have come to pass. But then people say what is to is must is. But look at that, eh! Look how in this tower of babel, most of us, is only one language we know how to talk.

All I know is, looking back at it now, one thing that sure is that before talk break, before thing turn ole mass I tell you, the dogs and the spirits did well know

Merle Collins-"The Signs"

Merle Collins soul-searching first novel, Angel, published four years after the implosion of the Grenada Revolution, articulates the growth to political consciousness of its female protagonist, Angel, and simultaneously traces the evolution of radical nationalist politics in the small island state. Focusing on three generations of women, the novel foregrounds issues of color, class, gender, (dis) empowerment, voice, and identity that illuminate the processes of social change in Grenada that culminate in the revolution and its disillusioning aftermath. In The Colour of Forgetting Collins continues to question the meaning of the revolution, particularly for those long-memoried peasant folk who never quite believe the grandiloquent rhetoric of politicians.

Despite the conventional disclaimer, "[t]his is a work of fiction and any resemblance to persons living or dead is purely coincidental" (2),

-176-

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