Arms Akimbo: Africana Women in Contemporary Literature

By Janice Lee Liddell; Yakini Belinda Kemp | Go to book overview
Save to active project

13
Meditations on Her/Story
Maryse Conde's I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem and the Slave Narrative Tradition

PAULA C. BARNES

Mary Helen Washington titles her introduction to Invented Lives: Narratives of Black Women, 1860-1960, "Meditations on History: The Slave Woman's Voice." Through alluding to William Styron's (in) famous line, "meditation on history," Washington seeks to bring to the forefront the voices of slave women who had been "rendered invisible" not only in Douglass 1845 Narrative but also the slave narratives in general, as women's narratives account for only twelve percent of that tradition (7). While none of the female narratives achieved prominence in their time, the recent burgeoning interest in slave narratives has led to their rediscovery and examination. Toni Morrison, in discussing her impetus for writing Beloved, noted the "deliberate omissions," that is, silences in these works ( Christian329). Apparently she was not the only writer to note such, for since 1979, there have been a number of novels for which slavery is the central focus, the majority of these written by women. Deborah McDowell, in answer to the question, "[W]hy the compulsion to repeat the story of slavery in the contemporary African-American novel?" suggests that Black female writers are "re-presenting" the female experience in slavery ( McDowell and Rampersad146). Women novelists, rendering the female slave experience visible and voiced, are revising the male canonized view; they are creating meditations on her/story.

In 1992, added to the African American novels addressing the female issue of slavery-- Octavia Butler Kindred ( 1979), Sherley Anne Williams's Dessa Rose ( 1986), Toni Morrison Beloved ( 1987), and J. California Cooper's Family ( 1991)--was the English translation of Maryse Conde Moi, Tituba, Sorciere . . . Noire de Salem, I, Tituba, Black

-193-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Arms Akimbo: Africana Women in Contemporary Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.