Arms Akimbo: Africana Women in Contemporary Literature

By Janice Lee Liddell; Yakini Belinda Kemp | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

Omisola Alleyne (formerly Zain A. Muse) graduated from Spelman College in 1994 after creating an independent major in Literature, Art, and Culture of the Caribbean and Afro-America. As part of this work, she studied at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica and conducted research in Cuba.

Paula C. Barnes is an associate professor of English at Hampton University in Virginia. Her current research and writing examines spirituality in contemporary African American women's fiction as well as the slave narrative tradition. She has published in Belles Lettres, Black Women in America: An Historical Encyclopedia, and The Oxford Companion to African American Literature.

Brenda F. Berrian teaches in the Department of Africana Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, specializing in women's writing from the Caribbean and Africa. She is the editor of Bibliography of African Women Writers and Journalists ( 1984) and the co-editor of Bibliography of Women Writers from the Caribbean ( 1989) Her critical essays have appeared in scholarly journals and books across the globe.

Erna Brodber is the author of two novels set in her home, Jamaica, Jane and Louisa Will Soon Come Home ( 1980) and Myal ( 1988). She worked as a children's caseworker and later earned her doctorate in sociology at the University of the West Indies, Mona, where she taught for several years. She has published monographs and case studies on Jamaican children, women, and urban life.

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