Booker T. Washington: The Wizard of Tuskegee 1901-1915

By Louis R. Harlan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
Atlanta and Brownsville

Surely, Thou too art not white, O Lord, a pale, bloodless, heartless thing?*

W. E. B. DU BOIS, 1906

I have your letter of the 2nd instant. . . . You can not have any information to give me privately to which I could pay heed, my dear Mr. Washington, because the information on which I act is that which came out in the investigation itself.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, 1906

TWO events of the fall of 1906 shattered with their rifle bullets the Washingtonian rhetoric of accommodation and progress and the Rooseveltian promise of an open door of opportunity for blacks. The Atlanta race riot, in the very city that had given birth to the Atlanta Compromise, and President Roosevelt's wholesale dismissal of three companies of black regular troops on weak evidence that some of them were involved in the Brownsville shoot-out with white citizens, both showed that there was something systemically wrong with Booker T. Washington's formula for the assimilation of blacks into American society. In the case of the Atlanta riot, the forces of white enlightenment on which the Atlanta Compromise depended neither prevented the race riot nor brought it to an end until it had done

____________________
*
"Litany of Atlanta," 1906.
Letter to BTW, November 5, 1906.

-295-

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Booker T. Washington: The Wizard of Tuskegee 1901-1915
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Contents xv
  • Chapter 1 Partners of Convenience: Washington and Roosevelt 3
  • Chapter 2 Black Intellectuals and the Boston Riot 32
  • Chapter 3 Conference at Carnegie Hall 63
  • Chapter 4 Damming Niagara 84
  • Chapter 5 Family Matters 107
  • Chapter 6 Other People's Money 128
  • Chapter 7 Tuskegee's People 143
  • Chapter 8 Other People's Schools 174
  • Chapter 9 Up from Serfdom 202
  • Chapter 10 a White Man's Country 238
  • Chapter 11 Provincial Man of the World 266
  • Chapter 12 Atlanta and Brownsville 295
  • Chapter 13 Brownsville Ghouls 323
  • Chapter 14 Black Politics in the Taft Era 338
  • Chapter 15 Washington and the Rise of the Naacp 359
  • Chapter 16 Night of Violence 379
  • Chapter 17 Outside Looking In 405
  • Chapter 18 Gonna Lay Down My Burden 438
  • Notes 459
  • Index 529
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