Booker T. Washington: The Wizard of Tuskegee 1901-1915

By Louis R. Harlan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 17
Outside Looking In

. . . like Nero, fiddling while Rome burns.
OSWALD GARRISON VILLARD, 1914

Anxious not to use word "protest"; nothing to be gained by giving that impression.

BTW, 1914

If the negro is segregated, it will probably mean that the sewerage in his part of the city will be inferior; that the streets and sidewalks will be neglected, that the street lighting will be poor, that his section of the city will not be kept in order by the police and other authorities, and that the "undesirables" of other races will be placed near him, thereby making it difficult for him to rear his family in decency.*

BTW, 1915

EVEN though the President of the United States no longer asked his advice, Booker T. Washington in his last years gave the outward impression of still being in charge of the Afro-American destiny, the black prince surrounded by his court, with much residual power and influence, still capable of wizardry, and still as busy as ever trying to be the all-purpose black leader. He kept up a grueling pace of

____________________
*
"My View of Segregation Laws" (posthumous publication), New Republic, December 4, 1915.

-405-

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Booker T. Washington: The Wizard of Tuskegee 1901-1915
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Contents xv
  • Chapter 1 Partners of Convenience: Washington and Roosevelt 3
  • Chapter 2 Black Intellectuals and the Boston Riot 32
  • Chapter 3 Conference at Carnegie Hall 63
  • Chapter 4 Damming Niagara 84
  • Chapter 5 Family Matters 107
  • Chapter 6 Other People's Money 128
  • Chapter 7 Tuskegee's People 143
  • Chapter 8 Other People's Schools 174
  • Chapter 9 Up from Serfdom 202
  • Chapter 10 a White Man's Country 238
  • Chapter 11 Provincial Man of the World 266
  • Chapter 12 Atlanta and Brownsville 295
  • Chapter 13 Brownsville Ghouls 323
  • Chapter 14 Black Politics in the Taft Era 338
  • Chapter 15 Washington and the Rise of the Naacp 359
  • Chapter 16 Night of Violence 379
  • Chapter 17 Outside Looking In 405
  • Chapter 18 Gonna Lay Down My Burden 438
  • Notes 459
  • Index 529
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