Swing to Bop: An Oral History of the Transition in Jazz in the 1940s

By Ira Gitler | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Immeasurable thanks to all the people who took the time to contribute their thoughts to the narrative. Gratitude to the Guggenheim Foundation without whose aid the project never would have been carried forward. A tip of my bop cap to my editor, Sheldon Meyer, for contracting the book and having the patience and informed guidance to help me to see it through. Appreciation to assistant editors, Pamela Nicely and Melissa Spielman, for their benevolent nitpicking. Kudos to the transcriber-typists: Patricia Ciro, Sarah McCarn Elliott, and Lora Rosner. Verbal medals to Bill Gottlieb for making his authentic photographs of the period available. The same to Dan Morgenstern, director of the institute of Jazz Studies, Rutgers University, not only for the photos from the Institute's archives, but for resolving the impasse over the book's title between Sheldon and myself, by suggesting Swing to Bop, incidentally the name of a Charlie Christian jam on "Topsy." Back in the photography department, a typewritten handshake to Robert Rondon for his inside jacket photo of me in a jazz festival attitude.

To Liz Rose, for the use of her Apple IIe and generous help, I can't say enough. Without them I'd probably still be doing the index. Last, but not least, tulips to my wife, Mary Jo, for her encouragement from inception to the final light at the end of the tunnel.

-ix-

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Swing to Bop: An Oral History of the Transition in Jazz in the 1940s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - The Road 9
  • 2 - Roots and Seeds 32
  • 3 - Minton's and Monroe's 75
  • 4 - Fifty-Second Street 118
  • 5 - California 160
  • 6 - Big-Band Bop 184
  • 7 - The Bop Era 219
  • 8 - End of an Era 291
  • Epilogue 318
  • Index 321
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