Swing to Bop: An Oral History of the Transition in Jazz in the 1940s

By Ira Gitler | Go to book overview

6
Big-Band Bop

When Gillespie returned to New York from Los Angeles in February 1946 he soon set up headquarters on 52nd Street again. On the 22nd of that month he recorded four sides for the New 52nd Street Jazz album, assembled by Leonard Feather, with Don Byas, Milt Jackson, Al Haig, guitarist Bill DeArango, Ray Brown, and J.C. Heard. A Coleman Hawkins-headed group of all-stars did the other four numbers in the album, which, despite RCA Victor's refusal to connect with the word "bop" (hence the title), became additions to the influential recorded music of the time.

At Clark Monroe's Spotlite, Dizzy's sidemen included Jackson, Haig, and Brown, with Stan Levey on drums and Leo Parker's baritone filling the reed role. When the group recorded for Musicraft in May, Sonny Stitt's alto had replaced Parker's baritone, and Kenny Clarke was in for Levey.

Then, at the same club, came the rebirth of the Gillespie orchestra. This time, unlike the "Hepsations" edition, there was an audience for Gillespie and his music, and the big band would thrive until 1950. Before Dizzy's band was established as a vital, continuing force, however, his and Bird's innovations had had an impact on other existing bands.

In California, just prior to and during the Gillespie-ParkerLos Angeles period, Benny Carter led a band in which sidemen of the new persuasion were developing. Even if the Carter scores were not in the bop mode, the soloists echoed the changes taking place at the time. The band was formed in New York, in late '42, and continued in California in November after having traveled across the country.

BENNY CARTER That's when I really started here and I guess I was here-- I didn't leave town again--until maybe in the spring of '43 when I went on a tour with the Nat Cole Trio, Savannah Churchill, and Tim

-184-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Swing to Bop: An Oral History of the Transition in Jazz in the 1940s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - The Road 9
  • 2 - Roots and Seeds 32
  • 3 - Minton's and Monroe's 75
  • 4 - Fifty-Second Street 118
  • 5 - California 160
  • 6 - Big-Band Bop 184
  • 7 - The Bop Era 219
  • 8 - End of an Era 291
  • Epilogue 318
  • Index 321
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.