Street Foods: Urban Food and Employment in Developing Countries

By Irene Tinker | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
Washington women leaders recall their individual efforts from 1960 to 1980 to change the shape of U.S. society through legislation in a book I edited in 1983, aptly tided Women in Washington Advocates for Public Policy. Many of us set up organizations to our purpose; among others, in 1972 I was elected first president of the Federation of Organizations for Professional Women, and in 1974, I was co-founder of the Wellesley Center for Research on Women. A temporary collaboration between these two organizations led to the founding of the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) as a federation project in 1976; ICRW became independent the following year.
2.
Boserup ( 1970) utilized much early literature on Africa; for pioneering studies in the early seventies see Hafkin and Bay 1976.
3.
This issue is of even more critical concern in my current research on urban food production. County-wide boundaries typical in China mask the variations of food density in urban core, peri-urban areas, and rural farms.

Chapter One
1.
A major demand of the Darul Islam was for a federal system of government that would allow the Sundanese to have their own Islamic state (see, for example, Feith 1962).
2.
For this reason, both male and female college students were hired as staff and were paired whenever they conducted surveys or interviews.
3.
Much of the funding for these groups came from external sources: international and bilateral aid agencies, foundations, and international NGOS.
4.
Such parking lot restaurants are very popular in Malaysia and Singapore, where restrictions on daytime street foods are increasing.
5.
The most widely distributed commercial brand of jamu is "Jago," the term used for fighting cocks in Indonesia.
6.
UNICEF subsequently funded a similar training program in Manila; see its analysis in chapter 2.

-217-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Street Foods: Urban Food and Employment in Developing Countries
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.