Dialogues and a Diary

By Igor Stravinsky; Robert Craft | Go to book overview

WORKING NOTES for The Flood

Stravinsky and Balanchine Hollywood, March 15-16 and April 11-12, 1962
1. Vacuum. Black scrim. The Prelude music is associated with Chaos, and at the end of the work with Sin. The 12/4 measure is a musical Jacob Ladder. As we follow it upward the black velvet ceiling opens up. Movements of clouds. Angels' wings fill the screen. The angels are Seraphim, Russian-style, and we are aware of their wings rather than of bodies or faces. The camera pulls downward and we discover that they are framed like icons, and that together they form a triangular altar. I.S.: "This iconostasis should resemble a real Byzantine altar with the Chiasma or X symbol on top. The piece begins and ends in the Church." The revelation of the iconostasis must be synchronized with the unfolding of the Noces-like Te Deum which is ( I.S.) "not Gregorian but Igorian chant." The voices should sound at measure 8 as though heralding from a great distance, and from there to measure 46, the musical climax, they should gradually move closer. At measure 46 the screen is filled with a "celestial effulgence" that washes out all detail.

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Dialogues and a Diary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations viii
  • Part 1 - Dialogues 1
  • A Greek Trilogy 3
  • Some People 37
  • Program Notes 70
  • Working Notes for the Flood 89
  • Appendix A 99
  • Appendix B 102
  • Part 2 - A Diary 105
  • 1958 111
  • 1959 116
  • 1960 140
  • 1962 195
  • Index 270
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