Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Interpreting as a Discourse Process

By Cynthia B. Roy | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

For over twenty-five years, as I interpreted and taught interpreters, I have also talked to and studied many of them. They are too numerous to name but to them I owe a heartfelt thanks for giving me their time and attention to talk about the fascinating job they do. Two colleagues in particular-- Cecilia Wadensjö and Katherine Langan--kept my interest in interpreting alive when I despaired of ever thinking about it again. They read drafts of the current text, offered suggestions, asked questions, and commented on terms, thoughts, and ideas. And they made it possible to talk about, think about, and write about interpreting and for that I am extremely grateful.

I thank Deborah Tannen for introducing me to the scholarly study of discourse analysis which I applied to the study of interpreting. I try to follow her example as a scholar, teacher, writer, and friend. Her interest, enthusiasm and support is a gift I treasure. I also thank Robert E. Johnson at Gallaudet University who encouraged and provided the means for me to pursue an inquiry into interpreting, never tired of discussing interpreting, read and edited my writing, and hired me to write and teach a master's degree in interpreting.

I thank the Student and the Interpreter who along with Deborah Tannen willingly allowed themselves to be videotaped, analyzed, and interviewed. I thank them for their faith and trust in me and for trusting that discovering interactional processes of interpreting was an important thing to do.

Other colleagues in interpreting whose friendship, interest, support and encouragement along the way have developed and sharpened my thoughts are: Robert M. Ingram, Etilvia Arjona-Tseng, Nancy Frishberg, Virginia Benmaman, Scott R. Loos, Jeffrey Davis, Elizabeth Winston, Dianne Falvo, Sharon Chasan, and many others.

During the original study I lived in Washington. D.C. while my family lived in New Orleans. Fran and Jack Hannan, Laurian and Ray

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Interpreting as a Discourse Process
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 146

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.