Blood Justice: The Lynching of Mack Charles Parker

By Howard Smead | Go to book overview

Appendix A
Conclusions of the Justice Department about Violations of Federal Law by Lynch Mobs (contained in letter from Malcolm R. Wilkey to William Rogers, May 25, 1959)
On the basis of the facts disclosed by the investigation, it would appear that there is some evidence of violence and a conspiracy to violate Section 1201 of Title 18, United States Code, relating to the transportation in interstate commerce of any person who has been unlawfully abducted and held for ransom or reward or otherwise. This evidence indicates that pursuant to a prearranged plan, Parker was taken from the jail by force and against his will, placed in Reyer's Oldsmobile, which was observed to leave the scene of the abduction and later was seen proceeding on Highway 26, across the Pearl River Bridge [Bogalusa Bridge], presumably into the State of Louisiana.Examination of the facts developed to date reveals that any federal criminal prosecution would encounter serious difficulties. In this regard your attention is invited to the following:
1. There is no direct evidence that Parker was actually in Reyer's car at the exact time that it allegedly crossed into Louisiana.
2. Though the evidence indicates that Reyer's car reached the Louisiana side of the Pearl River Bridge, it has not been conclusively shown that the car actually crossed the boundary line between Louisiana and Mississippi.
3. There is no evidence concerning the time and place of the murder; it is impossible to determine, therefore, whether or not Parker was alive at the time of the alleged interstate transportation. If Parker was fatally shot prior to such transportation, then it

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