Preface to Drama: An Introduction to Dramatic Literature and Theater Art

By Charles W. Cooper | Go to book overview
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streaked sky

pledge

Swallow them up. [He kneels.] Now, by yond marble heaven, In the due reverence of a sacred vow I here engage my words.

skies... embrace

actions

an obligation

IAGO. Do not rise yet. [Kneels.] Witness, you ever-burning lights above, You elements that clip us round about! Witness that here Iago doth give up The execution of his wit, hands, heart, To wronged Othello's service! Let him command, And to obey shall be in me remorse, What bloody work soever.

[They rise.]

to the test

OTHELLO. I greet thy love, Not with vain thanks, but with acceptance bounteous, And will upon the instant put thee to 't. Within these three days let me hear thee say That Cassio's not alive.

IAGO. My friend is dead. 'Tis done as you request. But let her live.

OTHELLO. Damn her, lewd minx! Oh, damn her! Come, go with me apart. I will withdraw To furnish me with some swift means of death For the fair devil.--Now art thou my lieutenant.

IAGO. I am your own forever.

[Exeunt.]


SCENE IV. Before the Citadel.

[Enter DESDEMONA, EMILIA, and the CLOWN.]

lodges

DESDEMONA. Do you know, sirrah, where Lieutenant Cassio lies?

CLOWN. I dare not say he lies anywhere.

DESDEMONA. Why, man?

CLOWN. He is a soldier, and for one to say a soldier lies is stabbing.

DESDEMONA. Go to! Where lodges he?

CLOWN. To tell you where he lodges is to tell you where I lie.

DESDEMONA. Can anything be made of this?

CLOWN. I know not where he lodges, and for me to devise a lodging, and say he lies here or he lies there, were to lie in mine own throat.

-276-

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Preface to Drama: An Introduction to Dramatic Literature and Theater Art
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