Preface to Drama: An Introduction to Dramatic Literature and Theater Art

By Charles W. Cooper | Go to book overview
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shall fall between us. Come, stand not amazed at it, but go along with me. I will show you such a necessity in his death that you shall think yourself bound to put it on him. It is now high supper time, and the night grows to waste. About it.

goes

RODERIGO. I will hear further reason for this.

IAGO. And you shall be satisfied.

[Exeunt.]


SCENE III. State Bedroom in the Citadel.

[Enter OTHELLO, LODOVICO, DESDEMONA, EMILIA, and ATTENDANTS.]

take a walk

immediately

dressing-gown

commend

Not at all!

LODOVICO. I do beseech you, sir, trouble yourself no further.

OTHELLO. Oh, pardon me, 'twill do me good to walk.

LODOVICO. Madam, good night. I humbly thank your ladyship.

DESDEMONA. Your honor is most welcome.

OTHELLO. Will you walk, sir?--
Oh, Desdemona.

DESDEMONA. My lord?

OTHELLO. Get you to bed on th' instant. I will be re--
turned forthwith.
Dismiss your attendant there. Look it be done.

DESDEMONA. I will, my lord.

[Exit OTHELLO, with LODOVICOand ATTENDANTS.]

EMILIA. How goes it now? He looks gender than he did.

DESDEMONA. He says he will return incontinent.
He hath commanded me to go to bed,
And bade me to dismiss you.

EMILIA. Dismiss me!

DESDEMONA. It was his bidding. Therefore, good
Emilia,
Give me my nightly wearing, and adieu.
We must not now displease him.

EMILIA. I would you had never seen him.

DESDEMONA. So would not I. My love doth so approve
him
That even his stubbornness, his checks and frowns--
Prithee, unpin me--have grace and favor in them.

EMILIA. I have laid those sheets you bade me on the bed.

No matter!

wayward

symbol of lost love

fate

Not to

dressing gown

good-looking

lower

put these away

hurry . . .

shortly

more

-297-

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