Preface to Drama: An Introduction to Dramatic Literature and Theater Art

By Charles W. Cooper | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

AN APPENDIX is the out-behind-the-barn of a book--or in-the-woodshed or down-in-the-basement, depending upon the society in which you were nurtured. It is the place to stow used lumber and almost discarded oddments. It is also the place to which the family tyrant repairs to discipline recalcitrant or errant youth, whether with strap or assignment of punitive duty. It is also the place for acknowledgment of stolen trifles and revelation of secret sources of information; whispered questions and answers on the nature and meaning of things; suggestions of places to go, things to do, books to read in the fuller experiencing of life--and occasional mischief too, of course, and trial flights of the more serious kind!

Out of sight is not always out of mind. The various materials hidden away here in the Appendix--once you have prowled around amongst them--will be remembered as occasion requires.

First of all, there are NOTES here for each of the five essays and short plays in Part One and for each of the plays with commentaries in Part Two. These are not the usual source notes, the centipedarian notes of the term paper or article of scholarship. They do indicate sources, of course, but are keyed to the essay sections rather than to the pages or the precise point of reference, and are intended to serve the larger purpose of suggesting the pertinent literature.

Second, in the appendix material for each essay and play comes a set of QUERIES. These are by no means exhaustive. They may be useful as the basis for some reflective thought following the reading of the play. Framing answers to them may serve to pattern the characters and action and meaning more clearly, and to fix the drama in mind. Or these queries may prove to be a springboard for group discussion.

Third is a series of SUGGESTIONS FOR STUDY for each essay and play. From these the instructor may wish to make class or individual assignments for written or oral reports, or they may well suggest yet other and more original undertakings to enlarge the scope of the course and put into effect the understandings of drama and life that are being developed.

-731-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Preface to Drama: An Introduction to Dramatic Literature and Theater Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 776

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.