European Theories of the Drama: An Anthology of Dramatic Theory and Criticism from Aristotle to the Present Day

By Barrett H. Clark | Go to book overview

SPANISH DRAMATIC CRITICISM OF THE GOLDEN AGE

Spanish literature as a whole has been rather freer from outside influence than that of other nations. The drama of the great age--the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries--was decidedly unclassic. The masterpieces of Lope de Vega and Calderon are, compared with the masterpieces of Corneille and Racine, shapeless and crude; they resemble rather the plays of the Elizabethans. The earliest Spanish criticism touching upon the theory of the drama are: the Arte de Trobar (written 1423, and later known as the Arte cisoria) of Enrique, Marquis (?) de Villena; the Preface to The Proverbs ( 1437) the Letter to the Constable of Portugal, of the Marquis de Santillana; and the Arte of Juan del Encina. The first of these was finished in 1434, the next two about the same time, while the last was published in 1496. Argore de Molina wrote a treatise on poetics which he prefixed to his Conde Lucanor ( 1575). But Spanish criticism proper did not begin until toward the close of the sixteenth century. Juan Diaz (or Alfonso) Rengifo Arte Poetics Española ( 1592), was a standard treatise on rhetoric, and was derived for the most part from Italian Renaissance critics.1 Alfonso Lopez [ El Pinciano] published in 1596 his Filosofia Antigua Poetica, in effect a protest against the prevailing "irregular" drama; Juan de la Cueva finished the writing of his Egemplar poético about 1606 (published in 1774); Carvallo published his Cisne de Apolo in 1602; Luis Carillo his Libro de Erudicion Poética in 1611; while Cascales ' Tablas poéticas did not appear until 1616. All these works are unmistakably Italian in origin, and such elements of classicism as are found in them are derived through Minturno, Scaliger, Robortello, and their contemporaries Juan de Mariana Tratado contra los Juegos Publicos ( 1609) may be mentioned among the attacks on the drama of the day. (An earlier attack, De Rege, appeared ten years before.) In 1609 Lope de Vega published his famous manifesto, the Arte neuvo de hazer comedias en este tiempo, which was a protest against the rules, especially the Unities. Cervantes' attack on Lopes practice appeared in the 48th chapter of Don Quixote, part I, which was published in 1605. Lope had already won his case, however, and a number of "defenders" of the form in which he had succeeded, published their justifications of his dramatic methods. The most interesting of these defenses is found in the Cigarrales de Toledo of the dramatist Tirso de Molina, which was published in 1624. Before this defense appeared, however, Lope had been defended by Francesco de la Barreda (in his Invectiva y Apologia, 1622), Julius Columbarius (in his Expostulatio Spongiae-- 1618), Alfonso Sanchez; and by Carlos Boil and "Ricardo del Turia" ( Pedro Juan de Rejaule y Toledo). Boil Romance a un licenciado que desebea hacer comedias, and Turia Apologetico de las comedias españolas both appeared in the Notre de la Poesia española ( 1616). In the Dedication to his play Pompeyo ( 1618) Christóval de Mesa protests against the licence of Lope's dramas. There is another in Cristóbal Suarez de Figueroa El Pasagero ( 1618). Among the later manifestos may be mentioned Diego de Colmenares ' Censura de Lope de Vega Carpio, o discurso de la nueva poesia, con una respuesta ( 1630), Gonzales de Salas ' Neuva Idea de la Tragedia Antigua, etc. ( 1633), and Juan Perez de Montalban's Prologue to the first volume of his Comedias ( 1638), his Para Todos ( 1632), José Pellicer de Tovar Idea de la Comedia de Castilla ( 1639). Calderon, the dominating figure of the mid- seventeenth century, is said to have

____________________
1
A curious and valuable document of the time, though not dealing with dramatic technique, is El viage entrenido ( 1603-04) of Agustin de Rojas Villandrando.--Ed.

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
European Theories of the Drama: An Anthology of Dramatic Theory and Criticism from Aristotle to the Present Day
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 503

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.