Democracy and the Organization of Political Parties - Vol. 1

By M. Ostrogorski; Frederick Clarke | Go to book overview

CONTENTS OF THE FIRST VOLUME
PAGE
PREFACE BY JAMES BRYCE, M.P.xxxix
AUTHOR'S PREFACEli
The problem of Government raised by the advent of democracy in face of the severance of the old social ties and the supremacy accorded to numbers in the State. Attempt at solution offered by extra-constitutional organization of the electoral masses. Scientific and practical importance of the study of this attempt. Why England is the best starting-point for that study. General plan of the work 2
FIRST PART
FIRST CHAPTER
THE OLD UNITY6
I. A single ruling class. The sources of its power. The landed property of the squires, the influence which they derive from it, and the public authority which they exercise. United by the feelings summed up in the idea of gentleman, they alone constitute society. Although exclusive, it is not closed to outsiders. Subject to this limitation it holds undivided sway, and meets with no opposition in the middle class, sunk in a dull life and unconscious of its strength; nor among the lawyers, confined to the exercise of their profession, which is kept alive by aristocratic clients; nor in local self-government, which is devoid of vitality; nor among the clergy, who, by their origin, aspirations and tastes constitute only a branch of the ruling class 6
II. The structure of the body politic exhibits the same unity under another aspect. The whole hierarchy of institutions and functions is built up in such manner that local administration, as well as the central government and even the government of the Church, are exercised by the same men. The spirit and the mode of working of the various public institutions emphasize the character of unity which runs through the political and social sphere. Monarchy, Parliament, supreme government, local administration, and the Church, in the variety of their

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