Studies in Communication: Contributed to the Communication Research Centre, University College, London

By A. J. Ayer; J. Z. Young et al. | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

I. BULWER LYTTONS' IMPRESSIONS OF ENGLISH SPEECH, c. 1830

'No -- I assure you -- now er -- er -- that -- er -- it was the most shocking accident possible -- er -- poor Chester was riding in the Park -- er -- you know that grey -- er (substantive dropped, hand a little flourished instead) -- of his -- splendid creature! -- er -- well sir, and by Jove -- er --

the -- er (no substantive, flourish again) -- took fright, and -- e -- er --5
here the gentleman throws up his chin and eyes, sinks back exhausted into his chair, and after a pause adds, 'Well, they took him into -- the shop -- there -- you know -- with the mahogany sashes -- just by the Park -- er -- and the -- er -- man there -- set his -- what'd'ye call it -- er --
collar-bone; but he was -- er -- ter -- ri -- bly -- terribly' -- a full stop10
. The gentleman shakes his head -- and the sentence is suspended to eternity.

* * *

'Oh, I can tell you exactly -- ehem -- he said you see, that he disliked the ministers, and so forth you understand -- but that -- er -- in these

times, and so forth -- and with this river of blood -- oh! he was very fine15
there! -- you must read it -- well, sir; and then he was very good against O'Connell, capital -- and all this agitation going on -- and murder, and so forth -- and then, sir, he told a capital story, about a man and his wife being murdered, and putting a child in the fireplace -- you see -- I
forget now, but it was capital; and then he wound up with -- a -- with --20
a -- in his usual way, in short. Oh! he quite justified himself -- you understand . . .


II. TRANSCRIPTIONS OF CONTEMPORARY SPEECH

Note: The symbols --, --, --- indicate relative
lengths of pause. In the phrases set in italics, important
intonation patterns are represented in terms of three
significant pitch levels, numbered -- from high to low -
2, 3, 4.

I've been very interested in --theElizabethandialogue -- how how
3 2 4
to read it without --- beingtooamusedby it and thetheirony the -
3 2 4 3 2 4 3

-181-

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Studies in Communication: Contributed to the Communication Research Centre, University College, London
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • What is Communication? 11
  • Communication in Biology 29
  • 'Communication Theory' -- and Human Behaviour 45
  • Communication in Economic Systems 69
  • The Influence of Language on Medicine 91
  • Interpretation of Visual Symbols in the Arts 109
  • Communication of Thought in Ancient Greece 125
  • The Experimental Study of Speech 147
  • Colloquial English and Communication 169
  • Appendix 181
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