Rhode Island Politics and the American Revolution, 1760- 1776

By David S. Lovejoy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
MOLASSES BEGINS THE DISPUTE

I

T HE DETERMINATION of the British Ministry in 1763 to enforce vigorously the Navigation Laws and particularly the old Molasses Act came as a complete surprise to the people of Rhode Island. The act which Parliament passed in 1733 laid a prohibitive duty of six pence on each gallon of foreign molasses and four shillings per hundredweight on foreign sugars imported into the American colonies. But it had never been troublesome since it was only infrequently enforced. Rhode Island's commerce which depended primarily on foreign West Indian trade had expanded by ignoring the duties. That Rhode Island was a trading center of importance in 1763 was owing mostly to evasion of the Molasses Act. The collection of duties prescribed by the act was as often winked at by the customs officials as it was by the colony's merchants.

The first blow came on May 1, 1763, when Parliament authorized the naval officers of His Majesty's ships operating along the coasts to make seizures of vessels and goods for violation of the laws of trade. The ships and cargoes seized by the King's officers were to be sold by the court condemning them to the highest bidder, and the net result was to be divided equally between the seizing officers and His Majesty's Exchequer.1 Rhode Island traders never had much fear for customs officials already in the colonies; but now, in and about their own ports, were armed vessels whose officers, with all the authority of customs officials, were more than willing to board colonial ships and make seizures.

In consequence of the act of 1763 the colonial Governors received fresh instructions directing them to suppress all illicit trade in any shape or manner. Naval vessels, some already in the colonies and some from England, were ordered to the various ports. In all, twenty of these

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rhode Island Politics and the American Revolution, 1760- 1776
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.