CHAPTER · EIGHT

It is pleasanter business to turn to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer in which Twain, the youth, achieved the best of his genius. Mr. William Lyon Phelps once ranked Twain as the greatest American novelist, placing him above Howells, James, and Hawthorne. Henry James rather hit the mark when he said that Twain's appeal is to rudimentary minds. When one has laughed all he can at the nonsense of The Gilded Age, and by that fact is no longer under the spell of the book's sound and glitter, its melodrama and fertile invention, its use of reality for the purposes of extravaganza, one can see the real substance of the book, one can see that it is only what it holds itself out to be -- a tale. Nor does it furnish to the future historian anything more than leads, if that, by which to follow down to the factual reality of America's insanity and corruption in those dreadful days after the Civil War. Mr. George Barnard Shaw was in a state of untrustworthy enthusiasm when he felt persuaded that Twain's works would enlighten posterity

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mark Twain: A Portrait
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Chapter · One 1
  • Chapter · Two 20
  • Chapter · Three 38
  • Chapter · Four 49
  • Chapter · Five 62
  • Chapter · Six 83
  • Chapter · Seven 98
  • Chapter · Eight 119
  • Chapter · Nine 139
  • Chapter · Ten 153
  • Chapter · Eleven 169
  • Chapter · Twelve 190
  • Chapter · Thirteen 208
  • Chapter · Fourteen 221
  • Chapter · Fifteen 239
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.