CHAPTER III
THE CONVERSION OF AMERICA

THE entrance of America into the war raised in many minds a seeming dilemma. Why did we take part in April, 1917, and not in August, 1914? If it was not a war for democracy, why were we in; if it was, why had we not been in from the beginning?

Though we are now at war, and war inhibits a true freedom of thought, yet as the foundations of our morality are concerned, we must face this problem honestly. What figure have we cut in this titanic shock in which we have allowed France to bleed and Serbia to be crushed, permitted Armenians to be slaughtered and suffered the democratic nations, including Australia and our neighbour Canada, to make supreme sacrifices, while we withheld even our approbation? Why did we not protest even after the fact against the invasion of Belgium? How can we today justify our minatory letters to England concerning our corn and beef and pig-iron? If this was a war for democracy, as the Allies claimed and as we today claim, were we not culpably blind or viciously neutral?--knowing and not caring, like "that caitiff choir who were not rebels, nor were faithful to God, but were for themselves."

-50-

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