Recollections of the Civil War: With the Leaders at Washington and in the Field in the Sixties

By Charles A. Dana | Go to book overview
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CHAPTER IX. .
THE REMOVAL OF ROSECRANS

Preparing to defend Chattanooga -- Effect on the army of the day of disaster and glory -- Mr. Dana suggests Grant or Thomas as Rosecrans's successor -- Portrait of Thomas -- The dignity and loyalty of his character illustrated -- The army reorganized -- It is threatened with starvation -- An estimate of Rosecrans -- He is relieved of the command of the Army of the Cumberland.

ALL the news we could get the next day of the enemy's movements seemed to show that the Confederate forces were concentrating on Chattanooga. Accordingly, Rosecrans gave orders for all our troops to gather in the town at once and prepare for the attack which would probably take place within a day or two. By midnight the army was in Chattanooga. The troops were in wonderful spirits, considering their excessive fatigues and heavy losses, and the next morning went to work with energy on the fortifications. All the morning of the 22d the enemy were approaching, resisted by our advance parties, and by the middle of the afternoon the artillery firing was so near that it seemed certain that the battle would be fought before dark. No attack was made that day, however, nor the next, and by the morning of the 24th the Herculean labors of the army had so fortified the place that it was certain that it could be taken only by a regular siege or by a turn

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