Southern Strategies: Southern Women and the Woman Suffrage Question

By Elna C. Green | Go to book overview

NOTES

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN NOTES
ADAH Alabama Department of Archives and History, Montgomery
ESL Equal Suffrage League
HWSHistory of Woman Suffrage
LCLibrary of Congress
LHCLouisiana Historical Center, New Orleans
NAWSA National American Woman Suffrage Association
NCDAH North Carolina Division of Archives and History, Raleigh
SHCSouthern Historical Collection, UNC- Chapel Hill
SL Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College, Cambridge, Mass.
TSLA Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville
UVA University of Virginia, Charlottesville
VCU Special Collections and Archives, James Cabell Library, Virginia
Commonwealth University, Richmond
VHS Virginia Historical Society, Richmond
VSLA Virginia State Library and Archives, Richmond

PREFACE
1. Here I follow the argument of Anne Firor Scott: "It is beyond any doubt that southern women wanted the vote primarily because of their concern about the place of women in the world, not because of their concern about the place of Negroes" ( Southern Lady, 183). Recent scholarship emphasizing the racism of southern suffragists includes Wheeler, New Women of the New South; Link, Paradox of Southern Progressivism; and Mary Martha Thomas, New Woman in Alabama. Historians who deemphasize the racism of southern suffragists (or emphasize the racism of the antisuffragists) include Glenda Gilmore, "Gender and Jim Crow"; Lebsock, "Woman Suffrage and White Supremacy"; and Turner, "White-Gloved Ladies."
2. Again, readers familiar with Anne Scott Southern Lady will note the similarities of our arguments. A suffrage movement was dependent upon the growth of a "constituency of self-confident women" and the presence of large numbers of both leaders and followers who had experiences in church societies and women's clubs ( Southern Lady, 176).
3. Hall, Revolt Against Chivalry, 21.
4. My disagreement with scholars like Wheeler falls in the category of degree rather than kind. Where Wheeler argues that "most [southern suffragists] were willing to use racist arguments" ( New Women of the New South, 101), I contend that most were not. I would place the majority of southern suffragists in the camp that avoided racism as the major argument in behalf of their enfranchisement.

-205-

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