The American Corporation Today

By Carl Kaysen | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations ( New York: Modern Library, 1965), bk. 5, pp. 715-16. Throughout this chapter, in addition to citing sources for quoted materials or references for statistical data, we offer suggestive, rather than comprehensive, sources for the general reader who may want to read further. For the more contemporary history we provide references only for works that probe more deeply than mass media reports.
2.
Peter Drucker, The Concept of the Corporation ( New York: John Day Co., 1946).
3.
Fritz Machlup, The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States ( Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1962).
4.
James R. Beniger, The Control Revolution: Technological and Economic Origins of the Information Society ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1988), pp. 22ff., provides a good summary of the data and the literature. On agricultural combines see the detailed corporate history by Wayne G. Broehl Jr., Cargill: Trading the World's Grain ( Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England, 1992).
5.
The best introduction to Chandler's work is Thomas K. McCraw, ed., The Essential Alfred Chandler ( Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1988). This collection includes the 1959 essay "The Beginnings of 'Big Business' in American Industry" which had originally appeared in the Business History Review. The main body of Chandler work is subsumed in his books The Visible Hand: The Managerial Revolution in American Business ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1977) and Scale and Scope ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1992).
6.
See Chandler Strategy and Structure: Chapters in the History of Industrial Enterprise ( Cambridge: MIT Press, 1962), esp. chap. 1.
7.
Several key works that have expanded the literature on corporations will be cited in subsequent notes to relevant passages, although two worth noting here are David Noble, America by Design: Science, Technology, and the Rise of Corporate Capitalism ( New York: Alfred Knopf, 1977) and Jonathan Hughes, The Vital Few: The Entrepreneur & American Economic Progress, expanded edition ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1986). Noble's book, which appeared in the same year as Chandler Visible Hand, was a neo-Marxist critique of corporate capitalism, which focused on the nexus of the engineering profession, institutions of higher education, and large-scale corporate development. Hughes's book, which embraces ten biographical sketches, is an engaging attempt to link the entrepreneurial activity of individuals to larger economic forces in a celebration of free enterprise. Chandler himself continued to study the nexus between technology and bureaucracy -- in works that, as his biographer put it, ran "narrow and deep" (see the introduction to The Essential Alfred Chandler). He, along with scholars from around the world, became interested in the comparative history of bureaucratic enterprise in the United

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