The American Corporation Today

By Carl Kaysen | Go to book overview

( Flynn 1994). As our semipublic, semiprivate social welfare system evolves, it is clear that the corporation will have a major and probably expanded role to play.


Notes

Support for this research was provided by a grant from the Sloan Foundation. The authors would like to thank Deborah Chien and Gordon Melmin for their capable research assistance. We would also like to thank the editor and other authors in this volume for their helpful comments. All opinions expressed are those of at least one of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Urban Institute or the Sloan Foundation. All errors are the responsibility of the authors alone.

1.
In 1985 public health spending was, on average, about 5.6 percent of GDP for the twenty-four OECD countries, compared with 4.6 percent in the United States. By contrast, private health expenditures were 1.7 percent of GDP in the OECD countries and 6.6 percent in the United States ( OECD 1990). Also in 1985, public pension expenditures averaged 9.3 percent of GDP in the big seven OECD countries, while they were 7.2 percent in the United States ( OECD 1988). Mean private pension assets of six selected European Community countries, meanwhile, were 32 percent of GDP; in the United States, the pension assets were 64 percent of GDP ( OECD 1994; Federal Reserve Board 1994).
2.
Wilbur Cohen, for instance, argues, "I am convinced that, in the United States, a program that deals only with the poor will end up being a poor program. . . . Ever since the Elizabethan Poor Law of 1601, programs only for the poor have been lousy, no good, poor programs. And a program that is only for the poor -- that has nothing in it for the middle income and upper income -- is, in the long run, a program the American people won't support. That is why I think one must find a way to link the interests of all classes in these programs." ( Cohen and Friedman 1972, p. 55).
3.
See Steuerle and Bakija ( 1994, chap. 2) for a further discussion of the arguments surrounding the debate over social insurance.
4.
Examples of the mandated public participation include social security and unemployment compensation; for subsidized private participation, employer-provided pensions and health insurance are the most obvious. Mandated automobile insurance is perhaps the only major example of mandated private coverage in the United States, but note that this mandate does not require the use of employers as agents.
5.
So-called multiemployer plans, for instance, allow workers to carry benefits from one company to another within the same union. Construction workers, for instance, often work for a variety of firms over short periods of time, and the porta

-379-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Corporation Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Contributors ix
  • 1 - Introduction and Overview 3
  • Appendix 20
  • 2 - The Rise and Transformation of the American Corporation 28
  • Notes 67
  • 3 - How American is the American Corporation? 74
  • Notes 97
  • 4 from Antitrust to Corporation Governance? the Corporation and the Law: 1959-1994 102
  • Notes 122
  • 5 - Financing the American Corporation: the Changing Menu of Financial Relationships 128
  • References 178
  • 6 - The U.S. Corporation and Technical Progress 187
  • References 231
  • 7 - The American Corporation as an Employer: Past, Present, and Future Possibilities 242
  • References 267
  • 8 - The Corporation Faces Issues of Race and Gender 269
  • Notes 290
  • 9 - Corporate Education and Training 292
  • References 319
  • 10 - The Modern Corporation as an Efficiency Instrument: the Comparative Contracting Perspective 327
  • Notes 354
  • Notes 356
  • 11 - The Corporation as a Dispenser of Welfare and Security 360
  • Notes 379
  • References 380
  • 12 - Almost Everywhere: Surging Inequality and Falling Real Wages 383
  • Notes 409
  • 13 - The Corporation as a Political Actor 413
  • Notes 433
  • 14 - Architecture and the Business Corporation 436
  • Notes 470
  • Index 487
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 501

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.